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Commander Karl Fischer

In the end of February 1944, major Paul Radomski was replaced by Karl Fischer, who continued the fierce
S.S. policy in a different way than his predecessor. He replaced Radomski’s cruelty with internal spying, so that he was able to control the camp more effectively. Free Greece (25.10.1946) reported on the commanding tactics
of Karl Fischer. Fischer was an S.S. too, part of the same school. He was tall, blonde and well structured. There
was nothing violent about him. He was always calm, well-mannered and self-disciplined. A better look showed
a methodical person, with thoughts hidden deeply inside. Fischer was well informed. Radomski had worked with
his whip well. He had trained the prisoners and left a mass well organized that could not be broken in any way. For this reason Fischer thought of a different way to break it. And there was no other way than treason.
He made it a system and cultivated it as much as he could. The right persons, with humble personality and light conscience, either artfully placed into the camp or prisoners themselves, unknown to everybody, slipped out by the crack of dawn and left notes at the commander’s door. The aim was to collect as much as possible information on the traffic in the camp and also about specific persons.
Fischer’s command saw the greatest mass executions since the foundation of the camp. Nonetheless, the tension
that had prevailed in Chaidari during Radomski loosened and the new commander did not use sadism and ferocity
in order to carry out his superiors’ orders.

In the end of February 1944, major Paul Radomski was replaced by Karl Fischer, who continued the fierce
S.S. policy in a different way than his predecessor. He replaced Radomski’s cruelty with internal spying, so that he was able to control the camp more effectively. Free Greece (25.10.1946) reported on the commanding tactics
of Karl Fischer. Fischer was an S.S. too, part of the same school. He was tall, blonde and well structured. There
was nothing violent about him. He was always calm, well-mannered and self-disciplined. A better look showed
a methodical person, with thoughts hidden deeply inside. Fischer was well informed. Radomski had worked with
his whip well. He had trained the prisoners and left a mass well organized that could not be broken in any way. For this reason Fischer thought of a different way to break it. And there was no other way than treason.
He made it a system and cultivated it as much as he could. The right persons, with humble personality and light conscience, either artfully placed into the camp or prisoners themselves, unknown to everybody, slipped out by the crack of dawn and left notes at the commander’s door. The aim was to collect as much as possible information on the traffic in the camp and also about specific persons.
Fischer’s command saw the greatest mass executions since the foundation of the camp. Nonetheless, the tension
that had prevailed in Chaidari during Radomski loosened and the new commander did not use sadism and ferocity
in order to carry out his superiors’ orders.