Greek English
Greek English


The Chaidari camp before the S.S.

The Chaidari camp operated under Italian administration for a few days only. Captain Roata, the commander,
was not harsh and allowed visits, letters and parcels. Prisoners were allowed to hang around the dormitories and were not subjected to forced labour.
After the Italian defeat, the Germans took over Chaidari on 10 September 1943. It was initially used as an
annex to the Averof prison, commanded by sergeant major Roudi Trepte. The new administration was harsh. Prisoners were restricted to their dormitories, except for meals, gymnastics and forced labour. Visits were allowed only once a month. The number of prisoners increased gradually. Three hundred came from Kalamata in October and were subjected to total isolation. Four hundred prisoners of the Italians came in early November from Averof. Among them was D. Paulakis, who remembers that he was placed in Block 4. No talking was permitted during meals. Prisoners were counted before bedtime.
They got up at seven and were re-counted at eight. Then they exercised and some helped with cooking. They were allowed out one hour every morning and evening.
Trepte used to say goodnight in Greek so his nickname became “Kalinychta”. His internal guard numbered eight men. Prisoners Panagiotis Maurommatis and Napoleon Soukatzidis were appointed interpretors. The two of them and Trepte too were arrested by the Gestapo on the 21st of November 1943 and were taken to Averof, perhaps
due to a fund misappropriation by the commander. In 23-28 November a German sergeant took over and then the administration was passed over to the S.S. and the infamous major Paul Radomski. General Stroop undertook the re-organization of the camp, and stayed for a few weeks, soa as to record, arrest and transfer to Poland all Greek Jews. He also organised the special torture rooms and the horrible isolation areas, with the help of the S.S..

The Chaidari camp operated under Italian administration for a few days only. Captain Roata, the commander,
was not harsh and allowed visits, letters and parcels. Prisoners were allowed to hang around the dormitories and were not subjected to forced labour.
After the Italian defeat, the Germans took over Chaidari on 10 September 1943. It was initially used as an
annex to the Averof prison, commanded by sergeant major Roudi Trepte. The new administration was harsh. Prisoners were restricted to their dormitories, except for meals, gymnastics and forced labour. Visits were allowed only once a month. The number of prisoners increased gradually. Three hundred came from Kalamata in October and were subjected to total isolation. Four hundred prisoners of the Italians came in early November from Averof. Among them was D. Paulakis, who remembers that he was placed in Block 4. No talking was permitted during meals. Prisoners were counted before bedtime.
They got up at seven and were re-counted at eight. Then they exercised and some helped with cooking. They were allowed out one hour every morning and evening.
Trepte used to say goodnight in Greek so his nickname became “Kalinychta”. His internal guard numbered eight men. Prisoners Panagiotis Maurommatis and Napoleon Soukatzidis were appointed interpretors. The two of them and Trepte too were arrested by the Gestapo on the 21st of November 1943 and were taken to Averof, perhaps
due to a fund misappropriation by the commander. In 23-28 November a German sergeant took over and then the administration was passed over to the S.S. and the infamous major Paul Radomski. General Stroop undertook the re-organization of the camp, and stayed for a few weeks, soa as to record, arrest and transfer to Poland all Greek Jews. He also organised the special torture rooms and the horrible isolation areas, with the help of the S.S..