Greek English
Greek English


Description of the camp buildings

The camp was rectangular. It had a tall enclosure wall with a triple barbed wire. Fortified guarding posts were
placed every 200 m. A double entrance was on the west side, flanked by guard posts. The exterior guard building, cooking area and food magazine were to the southeast of the entrance.
Inside the enclosure the area had been cleaned of the vegetation. Many building blocks lay west of the entrance. A. Zesis, prisoner between December 1943 and May 1944, has described soldiers with machine guns
on the Blockhaus buildings and only one access to the entrance, heavily guarded too.
Blocks 1-4 were built one after the other, each one divided into two equal sections with independent
entrances. They were the mens residence areas. Block 3 had a medical office and recovery area. The blocks were originally built as soldiers dormitories. They were two-storied and had a sub-basement and windows on all sides. Athens was clearly visible and Kornaros describes how it was impossible to imagine the agony and pain of the place, when first arriving and seeing the spectacular view.
Northeast of the food magazine lay Block 16, where the S.S. had installed a female isolation area. East of the magazines lay Block 20, the headquarters and Block 21, the barber’s, tailor’s, shoe-maker’s, ironsmith’s etc. Prisoners operated all these facilities.
The infamous Block 15 was east of the baths. It was first meant to be a military prison but then became the S.S. isolation area. It had iron framed windows and the inside was all plain. A. Zesis stayed in it for one hundred and twenty days in strict isolation. His memories mention the isolation, boosted by the restriction to approach closer than 500 m for everybody except the commander and the wardens.
The internal guard dormitories and their cooking area were east of Block 15. To the south of the dormitories was Block 14, a repository for items confiscated from Athens. Block 6, east of Blocks 13 and 14 was the female and children’s wing (Block 6) and the washing area. It was separated by wire. Jews stayed in the basement and
Christians on the ground floor. The second floor had a medical office and recovery area organized by
a prisoner, medical doctor A. Flountzis.
A high guarding post in the middle of the camp prevented men and women to approach the wire between the two sectors. Open areas were south of Blocks 3 and 4 at the cooking area. The rest of the camp was accessed only
by people working in the camp.

The camp was rectangular. It had a tall enclosure wall with a triple barbed wire. Fortified guarding posts were
placed every 200 m. A double entrance was on the west side, flanked by guard posts. The exterior guard building, cooking area and food magazine were to the southeast of the entrance.
Inside the enclosure the area had been cleaned of the vegetation. Many building blocks lay west of the entrance. A. Zesis, prisoner between December 1943 and May 1944, has described soldiers with machine guns
on the Blockhaus buildings and only one access to the entrance, heavily guarded too.
Blocks 1-4 were built one after the other, each one divided into two equal sections with independent
entrances. They were the mens residence areas. Block 3 had a medical office and recovery area. The blocks were originally built as soldiers dormitories. They were two-storied and had a sub-basement and windows on all sides. Athens was clearly visible and Kornaros describes how it was impossible to imagine the agony and pain of the place, when first arriving and seeing the spectacular view.
Northeast of the food magazine lay Block 16, where the S.S. had installed a female isolation area. East of the magazines lay Block 20, the headquarters and Block 21, the barber’s, tailor’s, shoe-maker’s, ironsmith’s etc. Prisoners operated all these facilities.
The infamous Block 15 was east of the baths. It was first meant to be a military prison but then became the S.S. isolation area. It had iron framed windows and the inside was all plain. A. Zesis stayed in it for one hundred and twenty days in strict isolation. His memories mention the isolation, boosted by the restriction to approach closer than 500 m for everybody except the commander and the wardens.
The internal guard dormitories and their cooking area were east of Block 15. To the south of the dormitories was Block 14, a repository for items confiscated from Athens. Block 6, east of Blocks 13 and 14 was the female and children’s wing (Block 6) and the washing area. It was separated by wire. Jews stayed in the basement and
Christians on the ground floor. The second floor had a medical office and recovery area organized by
a prisoner, medical doctor A. Flountzis.
A high guarding post in the middle of the camp prevented men and women to approach the wire between the two sectors. Open areas were south of Blocks 3 and 4 at the cooking area. The rest of the camp was accessed only
by people working in the camp.