Greek English
Greek English


The Palataki tower

The area of the battle of Chaidari is today occupied by a castle-like edifice, known as Palataki, which is, along with its surrounding area, a listed historical place since 1979. Palataki is an example of romantic historism with neogothic elements. Its basic features are its castle-like character, slim analogies and the gothic decorative elements (high-arched windows, terracotta decoration, embrasures and turrets). It has two stories, a main story and a semi-underground cooking and auxiliary area. The largest rooms are dining and reception areas. Ceilings
are painted. The small number of rooms indicates a country house, a hypothesis corroborated by its long distance from Athens.
The main building was flanked by auxiliary buildings, such as stables, guest quarters and olive press. The
central complex of the guest quarters is two-storied. It is flanked on one side by two single-storied annexes, that give the whole complex an L shape. The guest quarters is in neoclassical architectural style. The flower gardens, palm, fruit and other trees created an idyllic environment. The villa was part of an estate, the first owner of which
was Chaidar Pasha. C. Vyzantios, fighter in the Chaidari battles, mentions a fortified estate with a tower, probably
a forerunner of the existing building. The exact date of the latter but may be placed in the first decades after the Revolution. Some believe that the French architect François Boulanger (1807-1875) designed it together with the Queen’s Tower at Ilion. Both buildings are castle-like and have corner turrets. Queen Amalia had asked the architect to follow the Hohenschwangau palace as a prototype, which belonged to her cousin Maximilian in Schwanstein of Bavaria. The Queen’s Tower opened in August 1854.
It is also possible that the Chaidari tower was designed by S. Kleanthis (1802-1862), known from his gothicising mansions in Athens and Penteli for the Duchesse de Plaisence and one of the most important representatives of architectural romanticism in Greece. This hypothesis further assumes that the Palataki was also commissioned by Sophie de Marbois (1785-1854), Duchesse de Plaisence.
A legend says that the Duchess used it for her meetings with the infamous bandit Ntavelis. A final hypothesis supports that the first owner of the tower was king Otto I. The edifice then passed to N. Nazos, banker from Tenos, director of the Athens Odeon and art lover. N. Lytras and N. Gyzis, famous painters, frequented the place.
They painted the guest quarters and the small church of Agios Georgios. Georgios Thon, palace steward during Georgios I was the next owner. He was mainly known for his villa in Ampelokepoi and placed a marble stela in honour of Faviere in the Palataki entrance.
Early in the 20th century Palataki passed to the Chiot ship owner A. Palios and was systematically renovated. The ceiling paintings date to this period. According to several historical sources, it was G. Pachys who owned
Palataki in the late 19th – early 20th century. He married to E. Skouze, daughter of a high standing family and bought extensive estates from Amphiali to Palataki. His wife is assumed to have given a reception in Palataki for queen Olga in 1894. In 1957-1971 Palataki hosted a phsychiatric clinic, and suffered extensive damages. Today it hosts the Cultural Centre of the Chaidari Municipality.

The area of the battle of Chaidari is today occupied by a castle-like edifice, known as Palataki, which is, along with its surrounding area, a listed historical place since 1979. Palataki is an example of romantic historism with neogothic elements. Its basic features are its castle-like character, slim analogies and the gothic decorative elements (high-arched windows, terracotta decoration, embrasures and turrets). It has two stories, a main story and a semi-underground cooking and auxiliary area. The largest rooms are dining and reception areas. Ceilings
are painted. The small number of rooms indicates a country house, a hypothesis corroborated by its long distance from Athens.
The main building was flanked by auxiliary buildings, such as stables, guest quarters and olive press. The
central complex of the guest quarters is two-storied. It is flanked on one side by two single-storied annexes, that give the whole complex an L shape. The guest quarters is in neoclassical architectural style. The flower gardens, palm, fruit and other trees created an idyllic environment. The villa was part of an estate, the first owner of which
was Chaidar Pasha. C. Vyzantios, fighter in the Chaidari battles, mentions a fortified estate with a tower, probably
a forerunner of the existing building. The exact date of the latter but may be placed in the first decades after the Revolution. Some believe that the French architect François Boulanger (1807-1875) designed it together with the Queen’s Tower at Ilion. Both buildings are castle-like and have corner turrets. Queen Amalia had asked the architect to follow the Hohenschwangau palace as a prototype, which belonged to her cousin Maximilian in Schwanstein of Bavaria. The Queen’s Tower opened in August 1854.
It is also possible that the Chaidari tower was designed by S. Kleanthis (1802-1862), known from his gothicising mansions in Athens and Penteli for the Duchesse de Plaisence and one of the most important representatives of architectural romanticism in Greece. This hypothesis further assumes that the Palataki was also commissioned by Sophie de Marbois (1785-1854), Duchesse de Plaisence.
A legend says that the Duchess used it for her meetings with the infamous bandit Ntavelis. A final hypothesis supports that the first owner of the tower was king Otto I. The edifice then passed to N. Nazos, banker from Tenos, director of the Athens Odeon and art lover. N. Lytras and N. Gyzis, famous painters, frequented the place.
They painted the guest quarters and the small church of Agios Georgios. Georgios Thon, palace steward during Georgios I was the next owner. He was mainly known for his villa in Ampelokepoi and placed a marble stela in honour of Faviere in the Palataki entrance.
Early in the 20th century Palataki passed to the Chiot ship owner A. Palios and was systematically renovated. The ceiling paintings date to this period. According to several historical sources, it was G. Pachys who owned
Palataki in the late 19th – early 20th century. He married to E. Skouze, daughter of a high standing family and bought extensive estates from Amphiali to Palataki. His wife is assumed to have given a reception in Palataki for queen Olga in 1894. In 1957-1971 Palataki hosted a phsychiatric clinic, and suffered extensive damages. Today it hosts the Cultural Centre of the Chaidari Municipality.