Greek English
Greek English


The battles of Chaidari in August 1826.

The battles of Chaidari are described by guerilla captain C. Perraivos in his memoirs and by C. Vyzantios, captain
of the tactical army under C. Faviere. The two descriptions reveal different aspects of the historical facts including the arguments between the two armies, tactical and guerilla.
As soon as they arrived in Eleusina, Faviere suggested to wait for the cavalry to arrive, whereas Karaiskakis wanted them to attack, so that the guerillas do not disband.

The battle of the 6th of August 1826. On the midnight of the 5th of August both Greek armies camped
in the Chaidari garden, between Korydallos and Elaionas and close to Palataki. The guerillas notified both besieged Greeks and Turks of their arrival with gunfires and then fortified in the garden. Faviere was stationed out in the open field. The following sunrise a Turkish cavalry unit was repelled by the Greek guerillas with the help of the
Philhellenes. An hour later a complete Turkish corps with infantry, cavalry and artillery units attacked in vain and retreated. Faviere wanted to pursue them, but Karaiskakis was afraid of the open field between Chaidari and Athens and no attack was attempted. Thus, the first battle lasted eight hours and left many wounded, ten dead guerillas
and twenty soldiers. The Philhellenes and the band of Kriezotis played a distinguished role in the battle.
The officers’ evening meeting had to decide on the next step. Karaiskakis wanted to proceed to Piraeus, because he did not feel safe in Chaidari. Faviere disagreed and as they decided to stay, they received news that Kutahiye was leaving Athens. As the Greeks prepared to hit the retreating Turks, Homer Pasha arrived with three thousand
men and Kutahiye decided to move against Chaidari and crash the Greek camp.

The battle of the 8th of August 1826. The Greeks prepared for the battle against eight thousand soldiers and two thousand cavalry. Karaiskakis, in view of the enemy numbers, tried to encourage his soldiers. Faviere started fighting on his own against the Turkish cavalry. A Turkish attack disorganised them but he and the guerillas repelled the Turks. Kutahiye ordered a full attack against the guerillas. A few successful shots at the Turkish commanders disorganized the Turks and Perraivos suggested counter attack. In the meantime, the Turks fortified and started bombing the Greeks with their canons. Their cavalry tried to flank the Greeks, but was repelled by the Philhellenes. The battle lasted until the evening with the Greeks holding tight. Karaiskakis secretely took his troops out to Eleusina, fearing Turkish reinforcements. However, the tactical army was not informed. They had to fight through enemy lines in the night and thus left twenty wounded behind. This second battle was more fierce than the first. There were four hundred Turkish casualties and over seventy dead Greek soldiers. The Chaidari battles had no winner. The Greeks did not manage to relieve the Akropolis and understood that they should avoid open confrontation with the Turks.

The battles of Chaidari are described by guerilla captain C. Perraivos in his memoirs and by C. Vyzantios, captain
of the tactical army under C. Faviere. The two descriptions reveal different aspects of the historical facts including the arguments between the two armies, tactical and guerilla.
As soon as they arrived in Eleusina, Faviere suggested to wait for the cavalry to arrive, whereas Karaiskakis wanted them to attack, so that the guerillas do not disband.

The battle of the 6th of August 1826. On the midnight of the 5th of August both Greek armies camped
in the Chaidari garden, between Korydallos and Elaionas and close to Palataki. The guerillas notified both besieged Greeks and Turks of their arrival with gunfires and then fortified in the garden. Faviere was stationed out in the open field. The following sunrise a Turkish cavalry unit was repelled by the Greek guerillas with the help of the
Philhellenes. An hour later a complete Turkish corps with infantry, cavalry and artillery units attacked in vain and retreated. Faviere wanted to pursue them, but Karaiskakis was afraid of the open field between Chaidari and Athens and no attack was attempted. Thus, the first battle lasted eight hours and left many wounded, ten dead guerillas
and twenty soldiers. The Philhellenes and the band of Kriezotis played a distinguished role in the battle.
The officers’ evening meeting had to decide on the next step. Karaiskakis wanted to proceed to Piraeus, because he did not feel safe in Chaidari. Faviere disagreed and as they decided to stay, they received news that Kutahiye was leaving Athens. As the Greeks prepared to hit the retreating Turks, Homer Pasha arrived with three thousand
men and Kutahiye decided to move against Chaidari and crash the Greek camp.

The battle of the 8th of August 1826. The Greeks prepared for the battle against eight thousand soldiers and two thousand cavalry. Karaiskakis, in view of the enemy numbers, tried to encourage his soldiers. Faviere started fighting on his own against the Turkish cavalry. A Turkish attack disorganised them but he and the guerillas repelled the Turks. Kutahiye ordered a full attack against the guerillas. A few successful shots at the Turkish commanders disorganized the Turks and Perraivos suggested counter attack. In the meantime, the Turks fortified and started bombing the Greeks with their canons. Their cavalry tried to flank the Greeks, but was repelled by the Philhellenes. The battle lasted until the evening with the Greeks holding tight. Karaiskakis secretely took his troops out to Eleusina, fearing Turkish reinforcements. However, the tactical army was not informed. They had to fight through enemy lines in the night and thus left twenty wounded behind. This second battle was more fierce than the first. There were four hundred Turkish casualties and over seventy dead Greek soldiers. The Chaidari battles had no winner. The Greeks did not manage to relieve the Akropolis and understood that they should avoid open confrontation with the Turks.