Greek English
Greek English


The Daphni Monastery in the 11th and 12th century

The site today reflects the acme of the 11th and 12th century. The stylistic analysis of architecture and decoration places Daphni around 1080. The donor is unknown but the monumentality and elaborateness of the buildings points towards Constantinople, namely a high official or even the Emperor. Daphni has been connected
to Basil II, Slayer of the Bulgars (976-1025), who admired Athens and visited the town in 1018 after his vistory against the Bulgarians. Nonetheless, Daphni is actually later, i.e. contemporary with Basil’s successors.
Regardless of the identity of the donor, the monastery is part of a general building frenzy in Athens between the
10th and 12th century, resulting in about forty functioning churches in the town. Daphni, which is described in
detail below, featured a strong wall, an impressive catholicon of a composite octagonal type with high quality mosaics, cells and auxilliary buildings, e.g. refectory and cooking areas, baths, library etc, catering for the needs of the monks.

The site today reflects the acme of the 11th and 12th century. The stylistic analysis of architecture and decoration places Daphni around 1080. The donor is unknown but the monumentality and elaborateness of the buildings points towards Constantinople, namely a high official or even the Emperor. Daphni has been connected
to Basil II, Slayer of the Bulgars (976-1025), who admired Athens and visited the town in 1018 after his vistory against the Bulgarians. Nonetheless, Daphni is actually later, i.e. contemporary with Basil’s successors.
Regardless of the identity of the donor, the monastery is part of a general building frenzy in Athens between the
10th and 12th century, resulting in about forty functioning churches in the town. Daphni, which is described in
detail below, featured a strong wall, an impressive catholicon of a composite octagonal type with high quality mosaics, cells and auxilliary buildings, e.g. refectory and cooking areas, baths, library etc, catering for the needs of the monks.