Greek English
Greek English


Theseus travels to Athens and meets Prokroustes at Chaidari

Theseus, the most important Athenian hero was the son of Aigeus, king of Athens and Aithra, princess of Troizena. The child was raised in Troizena to avoid being murdered by Aigeus’ enemies. At the age of sixteen Theseus headed back to Athens. Despite his mother’s warning about bandits, Theseus decided to travel on land, as he wished to compete with the achievements of his cousin Hercules.
Theseus aimed to take exterminate all bandits from Troizena to Athens. He killed Periphetes at Epidauros, Sinis at the Corinthian gulf and after him Phaia, a wild boar, at Megaris. He threw Skiron into the sea at Kakia Skala and killed Kerkyon outside Eleusina. He met Sinis’ father, Polypemon or Prokroustes, at the wooded hills of Hermos. Prokroustes had two beds, one short and one long. He obliged short and tall travellers to lie on the wrong bed and killed them by either overstretching or chopping their legs.
Then, Theseus moved into Athens and later became king of the city. Plutarch mentions that Theseus was ritually cleansed from Sinis’ blood close to Kephisos river, and there is a sanctuary to Zeus in the area of today’s Agios Savvas church, on the north side of the Sacred Way.

 

Theseus, the most important Athenian hero was the son of Aigeus, king of Athens and Aithra, princess of Troizena. The child was raised in Troizena to avoid being murdered by Aigeus’ enemies. At the age of sixteen Theseus headed back to Athens. Despite his mother’s warning about bandits, Theseus decided to travel on land, as he wished to compete with the achievements of his cousin Hercules.
Theseus aimed to take exterminate all bandits from Troizena to Athens. He killed Periphetes at Epidauros, Sinis at the Corinthian gulf and after him Phaia, a wild boar, at Megaris. He threw Skiron into the sea at Kakia Skala and killed Kerkyon outside Eleusina. He met Sinis’ father, Polypemon or Prokroustes, at the wooded hills of Hermos. Prokroustes had two beds, one short and one long. He obliged short and tall travellers to lie on the wrong bed and killed them by either overstretching or chopping their legs.
Then, Theseus moved into Athens and later became king of the city. Plutarch mentions that Theseus was ritually cleansed from Sinis’ blood close to Kephisos river, and there is a sanctuary to Zeus in the area of today’s Agios Savvas church, on the north side of the Sacred Way.