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Kleisthenes’ reformations and the Hermos deme

In the 8th century BC, power in Athens was in the hands of few aristocratic land owners. Despite Solo’s legislation (594 BC), which created the basis for the Athenian democracy, through the abolition of debts and wider access to state offices, tension between rich and poor continued. This allowed Peisistratos first and then
his sons, Hipparchos and Hippias, to become tyrrants in the mid 6th century BC and until 510 BC. After their fall Kleisthenes of the Alkmeonides prevailed in the power struggle between wealthy families and reformed the Athenian state through his legislation (508 BC).
Aiming to economic, social and religious integration, he divided the Athenians into ten tribes of strictly local significance and divided the land into three zones: urban, coastal and middle. Each tribe should include demes
from all three zones, while the demes of the tribe within the same zone comprised a trittys. Tribes and demes had local authorities and their own treasuries and property.
The deme also kept the registries, and organized its own ritual ceremonies. In order to break up aristocratic descent, Kleisthenes obliged people to be called after their residence deme.
The Hermos deme belonged to the urban trittys of the Akamantis tribe and elected two Boule members. It was probably situated within Chaidari and Arpokration mentions a river Hermos, a stream below Daphni and into Kephisos river. The ancient settlement should lie around Daphni and at the
hill of Phrophitis Ilias. Hermos was probably a rural deme with few residents, as indicated by its few Boule members.

In the 8th century BC, power in Athens was in the hands of few aristocratic land owners. Despite Solo’s legislation (594 BC), which created the basis for the Athenian democracy, through the abolition of debts and wider access to state offices, tension between rich and poor continued. This allowed Peisistratos first and then
his sons, Hipparchos and Hippias, to become tyrrants in the mid 6th century BC and until 510 BC. After their fall Kleisthenes of the Alkmeonides prevailed in the power struggle between wealthy families and reformed the Athenian state through his legislation (508 BC).
Aiming to economic, social and religious integration, he divided the Athenians into ten tribes of strictly local significance and divided the land into three zones: urban, coastal and middle. Each tribe should include demes
from all three zones, while the demes of the tribe within the same zone comprised a trittys. Tribes and demes had local authorities and their own treasuries and property.
The deme also kept the registries, and organized its own ritual ceremonies. In order to break up aristocratic descent, Kleisthenes obliged people to be called after their residence deme.
The Hermos deme belonged to the urban trittys of the Akamantis tribe and elected two Boule members. It was probably situated within Chaidari and Arpokration mentions a river Hermos, a stream below Daphni and into Kephisos river. The ancient settlement should lie around Daphni and at the
hill of Phrophitis Ilias. Hermos was probably a rural deme with few residents, as indicated by its few Boule members.