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The burial monument of Pythionike on the Prophitis Ilias hill

The cenotaph commissioned by the Macedonian Arpalos
in honour of his wife Pythionike was the most impressive monument in Chaidari. Arpalos was a friend of Alexander the Great and treasurer in Babylon. When Arpalos was prosecuted for conspicuous spending, he found refuge in Athens and spent 2.5 million drachmas on the cenotaph
of the then dead Pythionike. Arpalos had built Pythionike
an imposing tomb in Babylon too, while he also commisioned an altar, dedicated to the cult of Aphrodite Pythionike.
The monument probably stood on the hill of Prophitis Ilias, although there is no supportive material evidence yet. Its form is unknown since written sources do not describe the monument itself, but only the authors’ impressions.
According to Kampouroglou the blocks of the monument were burnt into a large local Frankish or Ottoman lime
kiln, used by the Daphni monks. The kiln preserved remains of sculpted pieces. The non-existent monument triggered the imagination of modern travellers too, such
as the French scholar, doctor and historian and traveller
François Pouqueville (1770-1838).

The cenotaph commissioned by the Macedonian Arpalos
in honour of his wife Pythionike was the most impressive monument in Chaidari. Arpalos was a friend of Alexander the Great and treasurer in Babylon. When Arpalos was prosecuted for conspicuous spending, he found refuge in Athens and spent 2.5 million drachmas on the cenotaph
of the then dead Pythionike. Arpalos had built Pythionike
an imposing tomb in Babylon too, while he also commisioned an altar, dedicated to the cult of Aphrodite Pythionike.
The monument probably stood on the hill of Prophitis Ilias, although there is no supportive material evidence yet. Its form is unknown since written sources do not describe the monument itself, but only the authors’ impressions.
According to Kampouroglou the blocks of the monument were burnt into a large local Frankish or Ottoman lime
kiln, used by the Daphni monks. The kiln preserved remains of sculpted pieces. The non-existent monument triggered the imagination of modern travellers too, such
as the French scholar, doctor and historian and traveller
François Pouqueville (1770-1838).